Best Late Summer Flowers

There are many best late summer flowers to plant. But I don’t have many of them planted at this time in my patio garden.

What I have blooming right now are the wild morning glories that come up all over the place that are likely weeds.

I also have the allium plant flowers and some of the zinnias I planted from seed. Some of the zinnias have unfortunately already turned brown and withered away.

Butterflies love the summers late blooming flowers

Butterflies and bees love the zinnias as much as I do. I’ve also seen hummingbirds out there feasting on them.

If there’s an easier flower to grow than zinnias, I’d like to know what it is. Zinnias are annuals, meaning that they go from seed to flower to seed quickly.

Zinnias are native to Mexico and Central America. The Aztecs originally called them “plants that are hard on the eyes” because of their colorful flowers.

They have performed the best in my patio container garden.

Bees love the allium flowers that is one of the best late summer flowers that are still blooming

The insects love the allium flowers as well. Above is a bee enjoying itself.

Allium is a genus of monocotyledonous flowering plants that includes hundreds of species These include the cultivated onion, garlic, scallion, shallot, and leek.

Some of my zinnias are dying. But they are still some of the best late summer flowers to plant.

Here is what some of my zinnias now look like. They have dried from the sun and turned brown.

Still, they are kind of pretty I think, even in this dried-out state.

Light purple petunias are one of the best late summer flowers still blooming

This light purple petunia is getting more shade than the others. So it is doing better in terms of blooming because the heat hasn’t gotten to it as much here.

And I still have some petunias left. I planted three colors of petunias in the spring. The ones you see above have endured the best and longest.

Petunia, the genus of about 35 species of flowering plants in the nightshade family (Solanaceae), is native to South America.

19 Perennials Considered As Best Late Summer Flowers:

These multi-colored zinnias planted from seed are some of the best late summer flowers to plant.

15 Of The Best Annuals For Late Summer Flowers:

Wild purple morning glories are some of the best late summer flowers still blooming on my patio

Morning glories are one of September’s birth flowers. The other flower is the aster.

The last two years I’ve planted quite a few zinnia and morning glory seeds. I think the morning glory flowers I have are from a weed family, but at least they are colorful.

Due to the awful heat, I have not seen any of the morning glory seeds I actually planted bloom.

They have leaves still, so I’m hoping in September I may see different flower colors.

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16 Comments

  1. We just planted allium in the ground for the first time – it is so hearty and beautiful, that we’re going to plant a bunch more next year. And, the deer don’t eat it! My petunias were the first to expire this year – I blame it on a very rainy summer. The ones under a roof are still blooming. Zinnias remind me of my grandmother – she used to plant them in our backyard. You’ve convinced me to try them next summer!

  2. WOW!!! This post is FULL of information. I’ll be referring back to it for a very long time. Thank you for collecting all of these links.
    The 2 photos above, the one with the bee the other with the butterfly, are spectacular!

  3. Brenda:
    I gave up on Morning Glories. Although pretty, they re-seed something fierce. For the past three years, I have planted Hyacinth Bean Vine. The hummers and butterflies love it and it is easy come late fall/winter to pick the seeds and replant the next year.
    Ann Reynolds

  4. The first picture with the butterfly is fabulous. Even one of my trees has struggled this year in the heat. I can’t wait for fall temps.

    1. I lost my butterfly tree to winter as well as my rose. My Japanese maple in the pot is not looking so good, even though it’s in partial shade.

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