Recipes

Cooking Brisket With Sweet Onions

After I drank my cup of coffee yesterday morning I began putting together the ingredients for brisket with sweet onions.

I ordered the book “The Originial Slow Cooker Recipe Collection” from the makers of Crock Pot. And this was my first recipe to try.

You coat the inside of your crock pot with non-stick cooking spray. Then line the bottom with sweet onion slices. It called for 2 large sweet onions. I used less because I had cut the amount of brisket it called for in half and put the other half in the freezer.

Brisket, I found, is quite expensive. So I’ll use the other half another day. Besides, the whole brisket would not have fit in my crock pot. Half of it was just right.

In my electric skillet I browned both sides of the flat-cut boneless beef brisket adding salt and pepper. Then I transferred it to my crock pot. After that I poured a can of beef broth over the brisket. (It calls for 2 cans, but remember I cut the recipe by half). And then sprinkled the brisket with peppercorns.

I let it cook on high for about 7 hours. After I took it out of the crock pot, the instructions said to put it on a cutting board and loosely cover with foil. Let stand 10 to 15 minutes and then slice evenly against the grain.

To serve, arrange onions on serving platter and add the brisket slices on top. Serve with cooking liquid.

It was suggested to sprinkle with blue cheese, but I didn’t do this.

I served it with beans (my staple), sweet potato fries, cornbread and a salad.

Of course I forgot to take a picture of my meal. Sorry about that.

Here Is The Actual Recipe:

Brisket With Sweet Onions

  • 2 large sweet onions, cut into 10 (1/2-inch) slices
  • 1 flat-cut boneless beef brisket (about 3 and 1/2 pounds)
  • 2 cans (about 14 ounces each) beef broth
  • 1 tsp. cracked black peppercorns

Cover and cook on High for 5-7 hours.

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20 Comments

  1. Just put my first-ever brisket in the crockpot! I had our butcher cut it in half as you did and will freeze the second half. I’m fixing it just like you said. I’ve always been afraid that if I cooked a brisket in the oven, it would come out too tough. Your recipe is my favorite kind of recipe – Just a few ingredients and throw it in the crockpot. I also didn’t know that I could get sweet onions from my Walmart. I used some in sheet-pan chicken fajitas (another easy recipe with only a few ingredients), and the roasted onions were delicious! Thanks for the how-to on brisket! Looking forward to trying it for dinner tonight!

  2. Brisket is tender if made properly (low, slow and moist to break down the connective tissue) and the Crock Pot is one of the best ways to achieve this. If one were to try and grill it I’m sure it’d be tough and dry. Now, in Texas I believe, when they smoke it (BBQ) it’s low and slow and lots of brushing it with liquid. That technique is difficult to achieve at home. Your meal is making my mouth water. I love cookbooks but have gotten rid of all but my favorites. One I did keep is “101 Things to Do with a Slow Cooker”…. I have several in this series and use them all the time. “101 Things To Do With Rotisserie Chicken” is my 2nd favorite one. I hope you enjoyed your dinner as much as Ivy enjoyed her cornbread!!!!

  3. Looks like an inspiring cookbook for lots of good ideas. This post has motivated me to bake cornbread to serve with turkey hotdogs, sauerkraut, and beans. And to bring out my crock pot. Your recent post about the little milk glass covered hen on nest, prompted me to take the one I have and find a spot for it in my kitchen. I am so glad because it cheers me up seeing it now.

  4. That sounds like a yummy meal Brenda! I’ll have to try this meal sometimes and put the sweet potatoes or another kind of potato in the crockpot too.
    The last time I used my oval crockpot was when I cooked a ham in it and it came out so moist and tender!
    I just got a instant pot aura pro real cheap so I think I’ll try it in that bc I need to see if it works.
    Stay safe and have a awesome week ahead!

  5. Your recipe sounds good. I never have fixed brisket because of the half dozen times I’ve had it, only once was it really good and the other times it was dry. So I figured I would have no idea how to do it any better! If I find it on sale, I will have to give your recipe a try. In recent weeks we have used the Crock Pot for a pot roast, a whole chicken with vegetables, and to fix golden potatoes with onions and sausages. In the next couple of days I probably will use it to make some sort of bean soup or split pea soup. Thanks for sharing. Oh, I was thinking that if you saved your brisket receipt, maybe you could put it with your business expenses when you do taxes, because you wrote a post about it. Maybe you could get another post out of it by using the leftovers for sandwiches or tacos and taking photos.

  6. I love brisket. I only buy it around St Patrick’s day when it usually is on sale! I have never cooked it in the crockpot, but your recipe sounds good and I’m sure cooking it in the crockpot would make it nice and tender! Enjoy your meal!

  7. Love my crock pot although my large oval one I had for years stopped cooking after an hour when I was doing a ham and sweet potatoes in it recently. No recipe, just put them right in it cause the ham just needed to be warmed up. So my old one served me well all this time and I bought a smaller one for just us. I like putting all my leftover veggies, can of diced tomatoes and a box Of vegetable stock along with sliced onions and let it simmer for the day for soup for us. Sometimes I freeze little bits of leftover veges in small ziplock bags and try to keep separated to remember to throw them in the soup. Lots of meals for us with a grilled cheese sandwich. We rarely eat out in cooler months.

  8. I have a crock pot that is about 30 years old. It is used on a regular basis. You can take that brisket and just put it in the crock, cover it with barbeque sauce, turn it on for about 8 hours and you’ll have tender barbequed beef just like in the restaurants. I seldom if ever, precook the meat. I have taken frozen boneless, skinless chicken breasts and put them in the crock, poured on Italian dressing and we have delicious chicken for dinner. If you follow other blogs I’m sure you will find good crock pit recipes, plus there are so many recipes for crock pot cooking on Pinterest… I never bother with spending money on a cookbook. But, that’s me.

  9. Yum! You know that pic of you here is so attractive, I love the shaved head on you, brings out your eyes! I grew out my hair and have pulled it into a pony tail or clip and I think I have found the style I have needed for years, age 77. My hair was nice till about 10 years ago. Got thinner and didn’t hold style. I love recipes like this. Made one called crack chicken, hate the name but very tasty, uses dry hidden valley dip mix.

  10. I just love recipes like that! So easy, relatively quick to put together and then it just takes care of itself and does it slow cook delicious thing inside the crock pot all by itself and you don’t even have to think about it except to remember what time to check it and turn it off after 7 hours or so. This is the start of crock-pot/slow cooker season – when the leaves start falling like rain (or snow) in the brisk winds that whirl along, and the days are getting shorter than the nights, and the temperature is dropping, dropping, dropping, and the heat is turned on, and I’m going to be having my first fire in the gel fueled fire place this evening – yep, it’s that time for an easy-peasy recipe that simmers all day and fills the house with delicious aromas and warms one’s soul. I have three easy recipes that are always tummy and guest pleasers: beef stew, pot roast, and easy beef burgundy. My mouth is already watering just thinking of them. I’ve never tried brisket – I’ve read that it can be a tough meat to get cooked just right so that it’s juicy and tender and not tough and chewy. But then, I suppose that can be said about a lot of meats. And I always thought that brisket was a “bargain” cut of meat that would feed a lot of people for a little money. Just shows you how topsy-turvy our world has turned from the not-so-olden-days. Everything has gotten too expensive, especially beef. Maybe I’m just getting old myself and those not-so-olden-days really are pretty darn old! My grandparents were young and married during the Great Depression and raised 6 kids (dad’s family) and 7 kids (mom’s family). I can’t even begin to imagine. I grew up hearing stories from aunts and uncles and my grandparents about what it was like back then – so even though I wasn’t even a gleam in anyone’s eye at that time, I feel as though those days are very real to me, because I knew and loved people who lived through them – now, sadly, all gone. I guess autumn and the coming winter are also times to reflect on our lives and who we are, what we are, where we came from, and where we’re going. Hmmmm, maybe I just need a good stiff drink.

    1. That 3 and a half pounds of brisket cost me $25! I was shocked. I had the butcher cut it because I couldn’t find what I needed. I decided then and there that I would get at least three meals from each half.

      1. Sounds so good. I bet the apartment smelled wonderful. Those days of getting a dinner for $2-3 for your protein source are over sadly. I see the rents in Tulsa have shot up 30%. Yikes.

  11. That sounds really yummy and one to try very soon. Thank you for sharing the recipe. You crossed my mind recently when I was looking for a recipe from a cookbook called Cooking for One. Lots of wonderful meal ideas. There’s a Facebook group where others share some good ideas, as well.