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Even if you don’t have sunlight in your outdoor space, don’t despair. There are lots of beautiful plants that require some shade.

In the pots above are Red Giant mustard, pansies, petunias and Red Russian kale.

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Mophead hydrangeas, red tuberous begonias, coleus wizard sport, black mondo grass and creeping jenny are mixed in this container.

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Various coral bells with their pretty delicate leaves.

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Cast Iron plant, caladiums, impatiens, asparagus fern, variegated English ivy and creeping fig.

shade plants

A mixture of coleus and impatiens.

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Coleus, wire vine, euphorbia, lysimachia and petunias fill this pot.

container plants

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Cordyline, elephant ear, anthurium, tuberous begonia, and ivy.

container plants

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Coleus, verbena, fan flower, Joseph’s coat, calibrachoa, and petunia.

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A varied pot of elephant ears in this pot.

10 Annuals For Shade:

  1. Fuchias
  2. Balsam
  3. Lobelia
  4. Torenia
  5. Oxalis
  6. Impatiens
  7. Coleus
  8. Sweet potato vine
  9. Viola/pansy
  10. Sweet Alyssum

10 Perennials For Shade:

  1. Hosta
  2. Toad lily
  3. Ajuga
  4. Old-fashioned bleeding heart
  5. Hosta
  6. Coral bells
  7. Lamium
  8. Hellebore
  9. Astilbe
  10. Ferns

The best plants to plant in the shade depends on a variety of factors, including your soil type and your geographical location (overall temperature, moisture, etc.).

What does sun to part shade mean?
 
Full sun means at least 6 hours sun per day, but some plants like vegetables really need 8-10 hours sun per day.
 
Partial sun or partial shade means that the plant needs 3-6 hours of direct sun per day. Sometimes the terms are used interchangeably.

 

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3 Comments

  1. I do have a few spaces in the yard for plants requiring a bit of shade. I do appreciate this list and I really like seeing the container pots with a variety of plants. I love the pot with the elephant ears — the colors look so pretty together. And coleus always look so nice and are so easy to care for.

  2. Enjoyed this post very much, as I mostly have a shade garden now with only morning sun. Surprisingly, I have had success with salvias though I suppose they would flower more with more sun. I love their heart-shaped leaves! Coleus was a success last year so I hope to have more than one color variety this year. Blue daze evolvulus also does very well for me since it likes heat, which we have plenty of in Austin. Keep the gardening posts coming! It’s an exciting time of year for container gardeners like us.

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