Contentment

It was actually a bit cooler this morning. When Charlie and I went out around 7 a.m. I glanced at the thermometer hanging on the fence and saw it was 80 degrees.

There was the slightest bit of a breeze that sent the wind chimes dancing with the sound of water flowing from the fountain in the background. A lovely combination of mellow music.

A soft rain began to fall. It felt good tip-tapping on my shaved head.

I shave it every week or so because I like it that way. The freedom of it. The independence from having to fuss with my hair.

Growing up, and all my life, I tried so hard to fit in. To say the right things. And now I’m more secure with myself.

I suppose my shaved head is a symbol of my independence from once feeling so timid and diminished.

It is my way of saying: “This is who I am. Like me or not. Judge me if you must. I no longer care.”

I walk around taking photos, as I always do. Then I pause and gently lift the big velvety leaves of the wide swath of Lamb’s Ear and pull out the dead leaves underneath.

I flashed back to when I was a child. This was reminiscent of when I would go into the hen house and lift the hens to latch onto the warm eggs underneath.

The hens would make little clucking sounds, letting me know they didn’t much like my intrusion into their dark shadowy little world.

Did you know that chickens growl? Hens commonly make this noise when they’re sitting on eggs and someone disturbs them. It’s a warning sound and may be followed by an attack or a peck.

When I went back outside I had to locate the big rooster before I could make a dash for the gate because it would run at me and peck my legs.

Back to the Lamb’s Ear. It may sound silly. But I thank the brown leaves underneath for the beauty they had given me before they withered and turned brown.

Before the new leaves on top shadowed them from the sun and crowded them out.

I talk to the plants, cajole them to bloom, coddle them like I am the guardian and they are my children.

I have an abundance of little tomatoes. Sometimes I pop one in my mouth as I walk about the patio. They are so tasty as the juice squirts into my mouth.

The last two nights I’ve eaten chicken tacos with spring greens. And my cherry tomatoes with a sprinkling of pepper jack cheese on top.

I add a little bowl of pinto beans to complete my meal.

I look to the two trees; the butterfly tree and the Japanese Maple, both in pots. They have done so well in their containers and are so beautiful. I will have to find even bigger pots soon to transplant them into.

I’ve already transplanted Jade, the Gingko Biloba jade butterfly tree, into a bigger pot once already. And then I took that container and planted the Japanese Maple in it I got last spring.

Charlie sniffs about, sneezes. Dr. Poteet and I talked on the phone last weekend and he has me giving him Zyrtec. I found the generic, much cheaper at Amazon, and ordered that.

My allergies are terrible this year too. I usually don’t have this rough a time of it. Something in the air is different this year.

I come inside and dole out Charlie’s morning meds and feed the pets.

As soon as Ivy hears me she comes into the kitchen and paces up and down until I take her bowl back to the bedroom where I feed her up on a table so Charlie can’t get to it.

It’s far too rich for his delicate tummy.

Charlie snuffles up his egg and looks to me for his treat. His treats are actually soft little pockets I sneak his pills inside so he will swallow them.

And we go on with our morning routine.

Charlie is now asleep against my legs in the recliner. Ivy is snoozing on the couch.

The ceiling fans send the wind chimes tinkling. I stare out the French doors at my plants on the patio.

I am content. With myself. With my little apartment.

I feel whole.


Life is so beautiful when you’re content with all that you have.
– Malika E Nura

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19 Comments

  1. It’s not the heat, but the humidity! That is what my mom always said. I love the heat, but not the mugginess. I am still working from home, not getting dressed really except for being back in church Sunday morning. I get a shower, comb out my wet hair and then I tell dear hubby that i need my hair braided. I don’t like it in my face or on my neck in the summer. I like it kept back and up off my neck. My boys are still picky, but my two boys asked to get their haircuts shorter, but not buzzed for the summer. They have blonde hair and fair skin, so no shorter than 1/2” on the top to avoid sunburning. Hubby cut his own hair much shorter for the summer, and took his beard down low, but not shaved. He is retired military, so keeping the beard is part of his retired self image. I prefer his hair kept shorter, so I gave him plenty of compliments and told him how sexy he looks. He does a lot of work on the farm, so he is sweaty when he comes in. But he is doing wood cutting and splitting as well as garden chores. We are still making runs to get groceries and Home Depot and Tractor Supply, plus we are getting into our summer routine, some trips to the lake and swim. And every night we like eating on the deck. We are doing campfires and making smores. Life on the farm is hard work, but I love it.

  2. There is much contentment in the simple routines of each day as well as peaceful and pretty surroundings.

  3. Getting to a point in life where you one say “I no longer care” is a very liberating place to be. Contentment is a wonderful place to be… dare I say preferable to being happy (at least in my mind)?
    You have created a wonderful oasis for you and your fur babies!!!!

  4. This is lovely, Brenda. Been thinking of you as we come up on this Juneteenth; we all know Tulsa will get ‘hot’ this weekend. Hope you’re settling in for a quiet , safe, weekend at home-your daughters as well. Be safe.
    Kris

  5. I loved this post. Yes, it is wonderful to reach the place in your life where you are content with yourself and your surroundings. I am experiencing this feeling myself, and it is good to be alive.

  6. Wonderful post, Brenda. Thank you. I think as we grow older, the small joys become the great joys.
    Have a peaceful week-end.
    Mary

  7. The photos you take of your flowers and garden are soooooo beautiful. Some of my blooms are beautiful too, but I don’t have anywhere near your talent at taking photos. It’s a gift and a talent that is developed over time, part instinct, part learning by experience. I know what I want to do with the camera, but I just can’t ever get it to do what I would like it to do, LOL. Well, taking photos is not my forte, I just have to accept that. That’s why I don’t invest in a newer better camera. It bugs me, too, that technology deliberately MAKES things that are not inexpensive become obsolete, although I still use my 5 pixel Nikon which, when I bought it, was a true splurge. I was still working at the time though, and used part of an income tax refund to buy it – it cost several hundred dollars at the time! And now I’m just supposed to junk it? NO WAY. Stay safe in your beautiful sanctuary and physical ode to nature, Brenda.

  8. Lovely post today Brenda. Reminded me of the need to be content with what we have. So many blessings. You really are a constant gardener!!! I know your plants and four legged friends are grateful for your love and care. Be well.

  9. The peace and beauty of your words nearly lulled me to sleep, as if I were gently rocked in a shaded hammock, sheltered by a bounty of leaves. So many frantic people out there, desperately grasping for things they think will make them happy. They’d be so envious to see what you have found in your small-space paradise, kept company by two little busy balls of furry personality!
    Please, please, please, Brenda, stay safe from the chaos that’s coming to a head tomorrow in your city. Selfishness. Anger. Arrogance. It’s evil. The polar opposite of the way you live.

  10. A very peaceful post that I enjoyed very much. I can almost hear the tinkling of your wind chimes.

  11. What a lovely post. Truly the simple things in life are the most satisfying. I think this realization is a big benefit of being older.

  12. Contentment is what we all strive for. When we’re young we are materialistic and goal driven and later we want less and less and desire tranquility and peace. Life has to teach us.
    P.S. I talk to my hosta.

  13. What a peaceful post, so calming. I agree with all the things you do and the reasons and feelings behind them. Sometimes with age comes wisdom and feelings of knowing and accepting who you are and being at peace with those feelings. We are so blessed and happier when we get to that level of calm. Everyone enjoy your day!

  14. Contentment for me, is living alone with my two pets, tending to my little plant garden, and at peace with who I am.
    It is hard to understand why many folks look outward, whether for material items or other people to make them whole. Maybe that comes with age, maybe not;
    I know some older folks pretty angry with life.
    Maybe it’s introspection and looking within. It has been for me at least.
    I enjoy your blog so much.
    It is nice to know that there are people like me out there, in this crazy world.
    Thanks, Brenda.

  15. I love looking at your garden .Glad to hear the weather has cooled down.Ivy and Charlie are so precious.Have a great day.